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Email : jiweici@hkucc.hku.hk
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Email : jiweici@hku.hk
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Social philosophy, political philosophy, ethics; modern and contemporary China viewed from the perspectives of social and political philosophy and ethics
to:
Social philosophy, political philosophy, ethics; modern and contemporary China viewed from the perspectives of social and political philosophy and ethics.
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* The Two Faces of Justice, Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2006.
* 《正义的两面》,北京: 三联书店,2001.
* Dialectic of the Chinese Revolution: From Utopianism to Hedonism, Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1994.
* “Agency and Other Stakes of Poverty,” Journal of Political Philosophy, online early view.
to:
* Moral China in the Age of Reform, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014.
* The Two Faces of Justice, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006.
*
《正义的两面》,北京: 三联书店,2001第一版,2014修订版。
* Dialectic of the Chinese Revolution: From Utopianism to Hedonism, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1994.
* “Liberty Rights and the Limits
of Liberal Democracy,” in Rowan Cruft, Matthew Liao, and Massimo Renzo, eds., Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015.
* “Do Liberal Egalitarians Really Believe in Equality Given Their Commitment to Equality of Opportunity?” in Uwe Steinhoff, ed., Do All Persons Have Equal Moral Worth? Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015.
* “Agency and Other Stakes of Poverty,” Journal of Political Philosophy, vol. 21, no. 2, 2013
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* “Evaluating Agency: A Fundamental Question for Social and Political Philosophy,” Metaphilosophy, vol. 42, no.3, 2011.
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* “Evaluating Agency: A Fundamental Question for Social and Political Philosophy,” Metaphilosophy, vol. 42, no. 3, 2011.
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* “Freedom and Realms of Living,” Philosophy East and West, vol. 41, no. 3, 1991.
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* “Freedom and Realms of Living,” Philosophy East and West, vol. 41, no. 3, 1991.
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* “Chapter Thirty-eight of the Daodejing as an Imaginary Genealogy of Morals,” in Chris Fraser, Dan Robins, and Timothy O’Leary, eds., Ethics in Early China, Hong Kong:
Hong Kong University Press, 2011.
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* “Chapter Thirty-eight of the Daodejing as an Imaginary Genealogy of Morals,” in Chris Fraser, Dan Robins, and Timothy O’Leary, eds., Ethics in Early China, Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2011.
October 10, 2012, at 05:18 PM by 119.236.145.110 -
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!Jiwei Ci
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!Jiwei Ci 慈继伟
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Professor, Department of Philosophy
School of Humanities, Faculty of Arts
University of Hong Kong
Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong

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Telephone : (852) 28592796, Fax : (852) 25598452

Jiwei Ci was born in Beijing and studied in Beijing
and Edinburgh. Before coming to Hong Kong, he had taught in Beijing and had been an Andrew Mellon Fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center, a Fellow at the National Humanities Center in North Carolina, and a Member of the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He teaches various subjects in moral and political philosophy, from time to time also offering courses on continental philosophy and on Confucianism. His research interests include theories of justice, the philosophical and cultural dimensions of capitalism, and the ethics and politics of communist and post-communist China. He is the author, in English, of ''Dialectic of the Chinese Revolution: From Utopianism to Hedonism'' (Stanford University Press, 1994) and, in Chinese, of a study of the moral psychology of justice entitled ''Zhengyi de liangmian'' (SDX, 2001).
to:
!!Research and teaching interests

Social philosophy
, political philosophy, ethics; modern and contemporary China viewed from the perspectives of social and political philosophy and ethics

!!Representative publications

* The Two Faces of Justice, Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2006.
* 《正义的两面》,北京: 三联书店,2001.
* Dialectic of
the Chinese Revolution: From Utopianism to Hedonism, Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1994.
* “Agency
and Other Stakes of Poverty,” Journal of Political Philosophy, online early view.
* “Chapter Thirty-eight of the Daodejing as an Imaginary Genealogy of Morals,” in Chris Fraser
, Dan Robins, and Timothy O’Leary, eds., Ethics in Early China, Hong Kong:
Hong Kong University Press, 2011.
* “Evaluating Agency: A Fundamental Question for Social
and Political Philosophy,” Metaphilosophy, vol. 42, no.3, 2011.
* “Redeeming Freedom,” in Stan van Hooft and Wim Vandekerckhove
, eds., Questioning Cosmopolitanism, Dordrecht: Springer, 2010.
* “What Is in the Cloud? —A Critical Engagement with Thomas Metzger on ‘the Clash between Chinese and Western Political Theories,’” boundary 2, vol. 34, no. 3, 2007.
* “Political Agency in Liberal Democracy,” Journal of Political Philosophy, vol. 14, no. 2, 2006.
* “Taking the Reasons for Human Rights Seriously,” Political Theory, vol. 33, no. 2, 2005.
* “Justice, Freedom, and the Moral Bounds of Capitalism,” Social Theory and Practice, vol. 25, no. 3, 1999.
* “Disenchantment, Desublimation, and Demoralization: Some Cultural Conjunctions of Capitalism,” New Literary History, vol. 30, no. 2, 1999.
* “Freedom and Realms of Living,” Philosophy East and West, vol. 41, no. 3, 1991
.
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Jiwei Ci was born in Beijing and studied in Beijing and Edinburgh. Before coming to Hong Kong, he had taught in Beijing and had been an Andrew Mellon Fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center, a Fellow at the National Humanities Center in North Carolina, and a Member of the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He teaches various subjects in moral and political philosophy, from time to time also offering courses on continental philosophy and on Confucianism. His research interests include theories of justice, the philosophical and cultural dimensions of capitalism, and the ethics and politics of communist and post-communist China. He is the author, in English, of Dialectic of the Chinese Revolution: From Utopianism to Hedonism (Stanford University Press, 1994) and, in Chinese, of a study of the moral psychology of justice entitled Zhengyi de liangmian (SDX, 2001).
to:
Jiwei Ci was born in Beijing and studied in Beijing and Edinburgh. Before coming to Hong Kong, he had taught in Beijing and had been an Andrew Mellon Fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center, a Fellow at the National Humanities Center in North Carolina, and a Member of the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He teaches various subjects in moral and political philosophy, from time to time also offering courses on continental philosophy and on Confucianism. His research interests include theories of justice, the philosophical and cultural dimensions of capitalism, and the ethics and politics of communist and post-communist China. He is the author, in English, of ''Dialectic of the Chinese Revolution: From Utopianism to Hedonism'' (Stanford University Press, 1994) and, in Chinese, of a study of the moral psychology of justice entitled ''Zhengyi de liangmian'' (SDX, 2001).
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Telephone : (852) 28592796

Fax : (852) 25598452
to:
Telephone : (852) 28592796, Fax : (852) 25598452
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!Jiwei Ci

Ph.D. (Edin)

Email : jiweici@hkucc.hku.hk

Telephone : (852) 28592796

Fax : (852) 25598452

Jiwei Ci was born in Beijing and studied in Beijing and Edinburgh. Before coming to Hong Kong, he had taught in Beijing and had been an Andrew Mellon Fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center, a Fellow at the National Humanities Center in North Carolina, and a Member of the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He teaches various subjects in moral and political philosophy, from time to time also offering courses on continental philosophy and on Confucianism. His research interests include theories of justice, the philosophical and cultural dimensions of capitalism, and the ethics and politics of communist and post-communist China. He is the author, in English, of Dialectic of the Chinese Revolution: From Utopianism to Hedonism (Stanford University Press, 1994) and, in Chinese, of a study of the moral psychology of justice entitled Zhengyi de liangmian (SDX, 2001).